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. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
. >> let me ask you about your life since 1975 first. when did you come to the united states? under what circumstances? >> i came first to. why? i stay as a refugee, like other vietnamese refugees. i stayed in camp pendleton for two months. >> california. >> yeah, in california. and then after that, i joined my family here in fair tax, virginia. so we live here for one year. and then one day i was invited by television, you know, showdown l.a., los angeles. so while in l.a., i met with some vietnamese friend. and then they convinced me that california have a better climate and whatever for me. so we decide to move down there in 1 1976. >> where do you live? >> well, we move around. first, we bought a house in huntington beach. with the money i make from the book. and from the speaking tour. i remember it was only $110,000 at that time, four-bedroom, nice house. i only had to put 10%, $12,000. and then i left huntington beach and then go to live in hong kong for almost three years. >> what years were those? >> 1988 to 1991. and then when i come back to america, we go to seattle for one ye
is the half-brother of the president of the united states. barack obama is not only a multimillionaire, produced the most powerful man in the world. and yet his half brother can't call him in a time of need and the same half brother is living in a six by 10 hut slum dog millionaire style in their room a slump of nairobi. he has to walk through sewage to get to the nearest street. so this is a guy that they not just in poverty, but you have to say in third world poverty. so what is going on here? the simple explanation is that barack obama is a hypocrite. he has made the idea that we have obligations to our fellow man the centerpiece of his reelection campaign. one of his favorite lines, which he recently uttered at the national prayer breakfast as we are our brothers keepers. and my film, 2016. by the way, the film is coming to michigan. you should look at our website 2016 the [applause] but in the film, i asked george that. i say george, obama says we are our brothers keeper. you are his brother. what has he done to keep you? harborview and make george says go ask him. so h
been -- had, done, which is to explain her strong connection to the united states. has not only has she been to this country five times -- 11 times, excuse me, five of them on private holidays, the most vacation time she has ever spent anywhere outside her privateutsi estate, some of her closestv friends are americans which may be one of the biggest surprises. she is also known -- she has also known every president from harry truman to barack obama with the exception of lyndonm johnson who tried but fail today meet her. i remember being impressed whenr an official at the american embassy in london told me that during the memorial service att st. paul's cathedral after the 9/11 attacks, the queen sang every single word of the american national anthem. and i would betsi that therem. aren't any presidents who canh sing all the words to "god save the queen." since we are here today on the national mall, i thought i woul focus on the queen's fondness ml for this country and its people, pote little known and well known, and in so doingnown illuminate corners of her life that can help you unde
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
for this is the books are conceived as a history of the united states sort of as told through biographies and i was looking for a woman subject for one of these and in fact i found one but my publisher wouldn't let me do it. can you guess what woman i was looking for and found? eleanor roosevelt. i mean, just the fact that it's a very short list of women who played a large role in american public life on whom i can hang a tale of four or five decades of american history. women have had of course their roles in private life but it is in the nature of private life it usually doesn't survive in the historical record. why did people start saving the letters of eleanor roosevelt? because she was important. do your correspondence save your letters that you write to them and then do they deposit them in the local historical society? well, maybe, and if they do you will become, can i use my words adviseably, here, you will become literally immortal. you will become immortal in letters because future historians will find those letters. they will say ah, that is what life was like at the beginning of the
this is that the original stevensons--there were seven brothers, who came to the united states in the 18th century so when they multiply, then you have legions and legions of stevensons who live all across the country now. c-span: where did they come from? >> guest: well, they came originally from scotland, from the lowlands in scotland and life got pretty dour and tough over there so then they went to scotland--excuse me, to ireland, and they're part of this big migration that comes to the united states in the 18th century; comes into pennsylvania and then works its way by means of the great philadelphia road down into the south. and each generation moves on. i mean, this is a really american story, this scots-irish migration. and then these people in turn populate areas of the south. and in a critical decision for the stevensons when they were living in kentucky, they chose to move into the free state of illinois. and, of course, their family history would have been entirely different had they stayed in the south, or even gone farther west into slave-holding states. c-span: what are we seeing right here
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
in the united states senate where i've worked with many republicans to do important things like cutting spending, putting a cap on federal spending, like banning earmarks, like cutting taxes, over a trillion dollars for small businesses and working families. cleaning up war contracting and protecting and promoting american jobs. todd has worked closely with michele bachmann, and together them and a few others have really pushed things that would really harm missouri families. on march 8th of 2011, todd akin said i don't like social security, i think it's a bad investment. he's gone on in this campaign to delineate what is the triple whammy to social security. not only does he not like it, he would privatize it, put it on the roller coaster of wall street. he would raise the retirement age, and he would lower the benefit. on august 18th of 2011, he said medicare was unconstitutional. and since that time he has, in fact, voted several times to voucherrize medicare, to turn seniors over to private insurance companies, to arm wrestle with them for coverage and whether their claims will be paid and m
to welcome to distinguished guests to explore the past, present and future of the united states constitution. our partners for tonight's program in honor of the constitution are the federalist society and the constitutional accountable lee center. thanks for the opportunity to collaborate with you. the declaration of independence was long heralded as the icon of our independence for nation had, the constitution did not get as much attention. not as stirring as the declaration, and it's for parchment pages to the declarations single sheet deter most casual readers. the lack of celebration or to its image. over the years it was exposed to sunlight and smoke but the constitution was never exhibited . when you view both the original documents upstairs in the rotunda you immediately see the difference. the declaration stated to the point of eligibility while the constitution which nearly as fresh as it did when describe presented it to the continental convention -- constitutional convention. celebrating constitution day on september 17th has been a longstanding tradition here of the national arch
is the only place in the united states that this has happened. but wars have often been an occasion for unity, for cohesion. you know, we are all in this together. we've all got to win this together, so we've got to put our more parochial interests aside and pulled together to win whatever word might be. but at the same time new york is a great magnet for immigrants from around the world, from its very earliest days in the 1620s onward, has been a place for discrete, separate populations of newcomers have often brought their own political cultures, the room loyalties and allegiances their ethnic and natural visages cultures and have ended up jostling each other. and especially at times of war come of this has the case in the year, sometimes the tragic consequences. i'm going to start by showing you these images, starting with the civil war. and again, the book starts well before that, but this is where we're starting tonight. so this is april of 1861 after the confederacy fired on fort sumter in the civil war began.
attacks directed against any president of the united states. completely funded in this case by a pair of brothers being oil barons named the koch brothers, with the assistance of an all too compliant american media. and you add those three elements together and to get the obama hate machine. so i would just like to see a little about each of those elements and then open it up for questions until the cameras are turned off. and let's start with a hate directed against obama. first, i've got to say i think criticism of any african president is fair game. i'm part of the white house press corps. i go to the white house every day. i would've been there today if i were coming down here, and everyday in front of the white house, pennsylvania avenue, there's a crowd of people protesting something. and i love the. i always make a point of checking out what they're for come with the issue of the day is. it's a very healthy part of our democracy. and criticism of the president of courses been around for a long time. if you want to go back to the ugliest presidential campaign history you can't g
plight. in fact, there was considerable pressure from the united states. this changed his mind that not a single bit. he said it was an erroneous mistake. he wasn't entirely sure that he wanted to live, but when it came clear to him that they might on anna, that she could conceivably die at the hands of the nazi's, he became relatively convinced that he was willing to give up. so what the hell of others, he did accomplish this. it involved a strange man who was one who took over and the colonel had a great deal to gain in making things difficult for freud. not a [inaudible] about what to do with freud. the one who had taken over for psycho analysis in berlin, there is considerable danger there. considerable danger for freud. it took, a tremendous strategist who loved freud dearly, a remarkable analyst, the last thing that she did was [inaudible] he wanted to do these five and 10 minute sessions. and redmond freud was going to give you a good 50 minutes. and that was the way it was supposed to be. after the end of the day, they took anna, she was not only extremely resourceful,
$16,000 every second george allen was the united states senator. voted to raise the debt ceiling four times, voted to raise his own salary four times. now he's talking like a conservative, but his record shows he can't have another crack at it because his actions don't match his word. again, i think the right strategy is an aggregated examination of deductions rather than fighting issue-to-issue. you can have the amount or percentage vary by income or how the tax code is already. that's the most likely path to lead to success. >> we're out of time on that answer. >> can i have time to rebut? >> not according to your rules. i like more than less, but going on. >> governor allen, virginia voters are divided on whether they want the affordable care act to stay or go because it's not completely ruled out and because it's so complex. do you want to completely get rid of the law as a stands and start over on health care reform from strach or favor -- scratch or favor another method? >> i'll use the first part to rebut comments tim made. tim talked about $16,000 of debt. now it's the spendin
. a duly trained catholic child, grew up by nuns, came to the united states at almost 18, and i married, do all the things i was told, and when my husband departed with someone else, i was there to take care of three children, to work, clean up, and education to really make a good salary. i continued taking care of them in when they finished high school, i went and i did my ged and became a nurse. that's my strongest memory of you is one day in the debate, surrounded by men, dealing with a situation of abortion, and they all rant and rave why women shouldn't do it, and you just said, quietly, but you stopped everybody from speaking when you said, gentlemen, remember where we are talking where the territory is. this belongs to her, and if she chooses, her doctor is compliant, but it is not for you to say. those words i passed to my daughters who have grown up to be independent, outrageously self-empowered. what i never had in my youth and in my childhood and growing up years and years as a wife. they have been able to stand by themselves, i put your books in their hands, and i went back in s
that this day has not been forgotten here on the floor of the united states senate. mr. cardin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. mr. cardin: i want to thank senator gillibrand for bringing this moment to the attention of the united states senate and the american people and thank senator rubio, senator durbin for being here. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years since that tragic event in which terrorists had the attention of the world in the olympics at munich. and it's hard to believe over the last 40 years we've experienced so much of the violence from extremists and terrorists, tomorrow we will commemorate the 11th anniversary of the attack on our own country, and we recognize that the only way that we can stand up to this type of extremism is to never forthe get. -- forget and dere-dedicate ourselves to do everything we can to root out extremists, to root out terrorists and to never forget the consequences of their actions. so i want thank senator gillibrand and senator rubio for the resolution that we passed in th
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)